Read How The Numbers On
The Glucose Test Meter
Can Be Yours....
DiaMetrix Blood Sugar Support Landmark Clinical Study Results
HomeThe ScienceThe ProductOur CustomersFAQAbout UsContact UsORDER TODAY

Cayenne Pepper and Diabetes

The Effects of Cayenne Pepper on Blood Sugar

Common names: African pepper; African red pepper; American red pepper; bird pepper, capsicum, cayenne, cayenne pepper, Spanish pepper, Casique or Poivre de Cayenne (French); Spanisher Pfeffer or Scholtenpfeffer (German).

Originally from South America, the cayenne plant has spread across the globe both as a food and as a medicine. Cayenne is very closely related to bell peppers, jalapeños, paprika, and other similar peppers.

Few studies have been done that show cayenne is directly effective for controlling blood sugar but cayenne has been shown to contribute to increased metabolism, and weight loss. It will often irritate stomach and intestinal tissues until you become accustomed to it, but usually irritation will resolve within two weeks. It can cause burning diarrhea also, which again, resolves within a short time.

Cayenne may have the best effect for people who are overweight, or with Type II diabetes and insulin resistance.

It can also help those whose diabetes has begun to slow their digestion and cause sluggishness in the colon. It can help with colitis or other bowel disorders, but caution should be used because it WILL get worse before it gets better, and in severe cases, may do more harm than is tolerable in the short term before the colon strengthens enough to handle it. For slowed intestines though, cayenne has a laxative effect, and it helps improve bowel health and reduce the risk of colon cancer which is increased in people with slower bowel function or chronic constipation.

Important Research and opinions on Cayenne and diabetes.

Toronto scientists cure disease in mice
Tom Blackwell, National Post
Published: Friday, December 15, 2006

In a discovery that has stunned even those behind it, scientists at a Toronto hospital say they have proof the body's nervous system helps trigger diabetes, opening the door to a potential near-cure of the disease that affects millions of Canadians.

Diabetic mice became healthy virtually overnight after researchers injected a substance to counteract the effect of malfunctioning pain neurons in the pancreas.

"I couldn't believe it," said Dr. Michael Salter, a pain expert at the Hospital for Sick Children and one of the scientists. "Mice with diabetes suddenly didn't have diabetes any more."

The researchers caution they have yet to confirm their findings in people, but say they expect results from human studies within a year or so. Any treatment that may emerge to help at least some patients would likely be years away from hitting the market.

But the excitement of the team from Sick Kids, whose work is being published today in the journal Cell, is almost palpable.

"I've never seen anything like it," said Dr. Hans Michael Dosch, an immunologist at the hospital and a leader of the studies. "In my career, this is unique."

Their conclusions upset conventional wisdom that Type 1 diabetes, the most serious form of the illness that typically first appears in childhood, was solely caused by auto-immune responses -- the body's immune system turning on itself.

They also conclude that there are far more similarities than previously thought between Type 1 and Type 2 diabetes, and that nerves likely play a role in other chronic inflammatory conditions, such as asthma and Crohn's disease.

The "paradigm-changing" study opens "a novel, exciting door to address one of the diseases with large societal impact," said Dr. Christian Stohler, a leading U.S. pain specialist and dean of dentistry at the University of Maryland, who has reviewed the work.

"The treatment and diagnosis of neuropathic diseases is poised to take a dramatic leap forward because of the impressive research."

About two million Canadians suffer from diabetes, 10% of them with Type 1, contributing to 41,000 deaths a year.

Insulin replacement therapy is the only treatment of Type 1, and cannot prevent many of the side effects, from heart attacks to kidney failure.

In Type 1 diabetes, the pancreas does not produce enough insulin to shift glucose into the cells that need it. In Type 2 diabetes, the insulin that is produced is not used effectively -- something called insulin resistance -- also resulting in poor absorption of glucose.

The problems stem partly from inflammation -- and eventual death -- of insulin-producing islet cells in the pancreas.

Dr. Dosch had concluded in a 1999 paper that there were surprising similarities between diabetes and multiple sclerosis, a central nervous system disease. His interest was also piqued by the presence around the insulin-producing islets of an "enormous" number of nerves, pain neurons primarily used to signal the brain that tissue has been damaged.

Suspecting a link between the nerves and diabetes, he and Dr. Salter used an old experimental trick -- injecting capsaicin, the active ingredient in hot chili peppers, to kill the pancreatic sensory nerves in mice that had an equivalent of Type 1 diabetes.

"Then we had the biggest shock of our lives," Dr. Dosch said. Almost immediately, the islets began producing insulin normally "It was a shock ? really out of left field, because nothing in the literature was saying anything about this."

It turns out the nerves secrete neuropeptides that are instrumental in the proper functioning of the islets. Further study by the team, which also involved the University of Calgary and the Jackson Laboratory in Maine, found that the nerves in diabetic mice were releasing too little of the neuropeptides, resulting in a "vicious cycle" of stress on the islets.

So next they injected the neuropeptide "substance P" in the pancreases of diabetic mice, a demanding task given the tiny size of the rodent organs. The results were dramatic.

The islet inflammation cleared up and the diabetes was gone. Some have remained in that state for as long as four months, with just one injection.

They also discovered that their treatments curbed the insulin resistance that is the hallmark of Type 2 diabetes, and that insulin resistance is a major factor in Type 1 diabetes, suggesting the two illnesses are quite similar.

While pain scientists have been receptive to the research, immunologists have voiced skepticism at the idea of the nervous system playing such a major role in the disease. Editors of Cell put the Toronto researchers through vigorous review to prove the validity of their conclusions, though an editorial in the publication gives a positive review of the work.

"It will no doubt cause a great deal of consternation," said Dr. Salter about his paper.

The researchers are now setting out to confirm that the connection between sensory nerves and diabetes holds true in humans. If it does, they will see if their treatments have the same effects on people as they did on mice.

Nothing is for sure, but "there is a great deal of promise," Dr. Salter said.

Important Natural Ingredients for Diabetes

More Natural Ingredients Shown Effective for Diabetes


Find the Most Effective Natural Herbs for Blood Sugar Control in One Clinically Tested Formulation.

DiaMetrix Success Stories for Blood Sugar Support

DiaMetrix Clinical Study for Blood Sugar Support

Nutrition vs Diabetes Movie

Buy 2 get 1 Free



Day Guarantee for DiaMetrix Blood Sugar Support

DiaMetrix® 60 Day
"No Questions Asked" Guarantee.

  read more
Code Blue Report for DiaMetrix Blood Sugar Support

Special Report:
"Health Care
Code Blue"

  read report
Glycemic Index Website from

Glycemic Index Website: It's all in what we eat!

  read more



Home | The Science | The Product | Our Customers | FAQ | About Us | Contact Us | Press Releases | Important Links | Herbs & Diabetes
Terms of Use | Site Map | New Approach | Glycemic Index | Order Today | Wholesale Program | Affiliate Program | Diabetic News
A1c Test | Insulin Resistance | Insulin Pump | Diabetic Foot Ulcers | pH Balance | Acupuncture | Diabetic Neuropathy | Gestational Diabetes
Diabetic Retinopathy | Diabetic Diets | Diabetes Dictionary | Story

DiaMetrix® is Exclusively Marketed by Steelbreeze Marketing, LLC
This Webite is Operated by Markit Health, LLC
Copyright © Steelbreeze Marketing, LLC


*These statements have not been evaluated by the Food and Drug Administration. This product is not intended to diagnose, treat, cure or prevent any disease.